Cliff and Mollie’s Wedding

May 5, 1897 – Rock Cave, West Virginia

An Excerpt From “Recollections” by Edward C. Jones, Sr.

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After my visit to see Mollie about November 1, 1896, there were many months to elapse before I would see her again. Letters were mailed regularly by both of us, and many definite plans were maturing. I bought a beautiful lot of eleventh-twelfths of an acre, overlooking, and fronting on the Black Water River. Arbutus grew naturally on the bank, as did much rhododendron. The property offered a view of the lovely valley up to Hendricks, and down the river nearly to Parsons, some two and one-half miles below. There was a beautiful meadow just across the river, while beyond this, there was a marvelous mountain range well covered with timber. The mountain was twelve hundred feet high. We would often see snow on the greater part of this mountain, while it would be raining below. During the early spring months, I contracted with Mr. W. A. Liller, of Keyser, West Virginia, to build for me, on this property, a very neat and cozy six room, two story house. It was to have a bathroom and basement with hot air furnace. It was to have a large porch across the front and halfway back on the side. In addition, there was to be an enclosed lattice covered back porch. Labor and lumber, as well as materials were extremely low in price at that time. I was able to get the house built for nine hundred dollars cash, although, in addition to this cost, I drilled a well, which cost about one hundred and thirty-five dollars, and built a fence, and made some other improvements which cost an additional amount. It was a most Picturesque and lovely little home, and was admired by many.

Our wedding day was finally set for Wednesday, May 5, 1897. My brother James came from home. I joined him on the train at Hambleton, on Monday, May 3. It was snowing that morning when I took the train, but it did not last long. Jim and I went to Elkins, West Virginia, and then took the train for Beverly, where I had arranged with a Mr. Daniels, who operated a livery stable there, to furnish us with a good, two horse carriage and driver, to take us at once across Rich Mountain to Buckhannon, West Virginia. The roads over this mountain were nothing short of terrible, as we found them to be badly cut up by teams getting out timber. At any rate, we arrived at Buckhannon late in the evening, and spent the night there. Next morning, Tuesday, we drove fifteen miles over rather muddy roads to Rock Cave. We stopped at the Boggs Hotel, directly across the street from Mollie’s home. That afternoon and evening was a time of much hilarity and fun, as many of Mollie’s relatives and intimate friends had gathered for the wedding. It was quite late that night before we retired, as we were all having such an enjoyable time.

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Mr. & Mrs. Edward Clifford Jones on their Wedding Day
Mr. & Mrs. Edward Clifford Jones on their Wedding Day

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The wedding was to be about eight o’clock Wednesday morning, to be followed by a wedding breakfast. All proceeded exactly as planned. The minister was Crawford L. Queen, and the ring ceremony was carried out. My brother, Jim, was my best man, while Ben, Mollie’s brother, gave the bride away. Lena Sinsell, a friend of Mollie’s, played the wedding march, and this happy event, so long looked forward to by us, was soon to reach a conclusion. After a most excellent breakfast, most of the party drove with us to Buckhannon, where we took the train at about two P. M. for Clarksburg. We stopped there for several hours, at The Trader’s Hotel, which then was considered the best in town. The party by this time, had been reduced to Miss Sinsell, brother Jim, Mollie, and myself. After an evening meal was served, along about ten P. M. we took the Baltimore and Ohio sleeper, enroute for Baltimore, Miss Sinsell getting off at Grafton, West Virginia. We arrived in Baltimore next morning at about eight o’clock, and went at once to the Rennert Hotel, where my Aunt Clara Touchstone, then living in Baltimore, joined the party. After a breakfast, such as only the Rennert could serve, we visited and rested until about one thirty o’clock, when we took a Pennsylvania Railroad train, enroute for Conowingo, near our home. Of course, my parents were very happy, as I was the first child in our family to be married. What a happy occasion it was! Most all my old friends were on hand to help with the festivities. A few days later, I visited Baltimore, in order to purchase at wholesale such furniture and equipment as was felt necessary for our new home, then being constructed. After several days more we again visited at home. My mother went with us, for a short stay in Washington, D. C. Here we stopped at Hotel Vendome, which had been recommended to us by friends. After several delightful days in Washington, we were anxious to get to Hambleton, a place Mollie had never seen, and where at this time most all our interests were centered.

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Updated 11 April 2010